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Create Envelope Art with the Joyous Juniper Stamps

Hello, Julie here. In today’s video I’ll show you how I created some cool envelope art using the Joyous Juniper stamp set. The stamp set is part of our Greenhouse Society Collection of stamps and matching dies. I had a lot of fun with the Joyous Juniper stamps and am really looking forward to making more envelope art with it!


Step-By-Step Instructions For Making Envelope Art

If you'd like to print out step-by-step instructions, here they are. Or bookmark this page for future reference!

  1. First, I stamped the image on the envelope using waterproof ink. Then I put a piece of chipboard into the envelope so that nothing could bleed through to the other side of the envelope, and to avoid any bumps from having creases or layers of the paper underneath. I got this piece from an old pad of list paper, but chipboard like this comes in all kinds of random packaging. Next I got out my water pen, my palette block, a piece of paper towel, and Distress Inks for the first half of this project. I spread my inks onto the pallet, a bit of Iced Spruce, and some Stormy Sky.

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  2. To start the coloring, I put down a water wash and then added color from my block. On this paper, the water wash is going to soak into the paper really quickly, so I had to do it in small batches. A little bit of water wash, and then color over that, then a little more water wash, and so on. This ink layer is just fairly flat color, starting with the Iced Spruce in the leaves and stems. This is just to provide sort of a background to the pencils. The color coverage just comes out smoother with a flat color background under the pencils.

    On the berries, I did pretty much the same thing with the Stormy Sky, one berry at a time. Wash and then color, and repeat.

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  3. Next came the pencils. I started with brown and greens for the stems and needles. Light Umber went in first, and I put it in pretty lightly on the stems only.

    Once the brown was in, I went into the needles with True Green, which is a sort of blue-tinted green. I just went into the ends of the needles with this, because I didn’t want to layer too much color on at once. Because this paper doesn’t have a lot of tooth, it’s possible that at some point the color won’t layer on any more.

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  4. After that was the warmer Apple Green along the base of the needles.

    Next was the Olive Green, which went on the stems over the brown, as well as the very base of each needle, to provide some shadow. I went back and forth with these colors until I had something I really liked.

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  5. Then, I started in on the berries with the Peacock Blue. I went over the berries with light circles of the peacock. Next was the Ultramarine Blue, which set up the shadow areas.

    A bit of Violet went in after that, to make the shadows nice and rich.

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  6. Once I got that in, I went back in with the Peacock blue pretty thickly over the lighter areas. It’s about the right color for the sort of smoky blue I wanted for my berries, so I wanted it to kind of take over. Next I went in with the white, over that second layer of Peacock blue and sort of smoothed it out, and lightened it up.

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  7. A little more ultramarine went into the shadows to blend them a little more, and then I started with the colorless blender.

    With the blender, I tend to move from dark to light so that if I have color built up on the pencil, I don’t get an accidental blob of dark color in the light area. Somehow it’s easier to blend a lighter color into the shadows than it is to deal with dark in the light. You can also just wipe the color off the blender pencil between berries if you want, using the paper towel.

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  8. Last, I added a bit more white as a highlight or shine – that little ‘ting!’ This required a bit more pressure, because I’d built up so much color in this area already.

    Juniper-Coloring-blog-post-graphics8



And I did all the berries like that, and ended up with something like this.

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I placed a label die cut on the front of the envelope and sponged some ink around it to make a space for my friends’ names and well, a fake address. The thing I loved about using the Joyous Juniper Stamp is that it fit perfectly into the pointed envelope flap. I love that on the back flap you see this beautiful image, but on the front, you just get a hint of the image, while the space for the stamp is still free. You can add your return address here on the front, or on the back somewhere. Keep in mind that as you get more on the envelope, the more likely it is that it will have to be hand-canceled. This just costs a touch more in postage, but shouldn’t slow anything down too much.

If you'd like to learn more about the Greenhouse Society Stamp Sets and matching dies, now is a good time. If you sign up to become a member by the end of this month, you'll receive a free stamp set. All the details are on our website.

I hope you learned something you can use on your next project. Have a great day!

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